Journalism History
Episode 94: Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus

Episode 94: Yes, Virginia, There is a Santa Claus

December 13, 2021

As a holiday tradition, we re-air our episode where hosts of the Journalism History podcast come together for a special Christmas episode that tells the story of an 8-year-old girl and the most reprinted editorial in the English language. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/

Episode 93: Journalism and Jim Crow

Episode 93: Journalism and Jim Crow

November 29, 2021

Professor Kathy Roberts Forde discusses her co-edited book, Journalism and Jim Crow: White Supremacy and the Black Struggle for a New America. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/

Episode 92: Truth and Ideology Among Cold War Correspondents

Episode 92: Truth and Ideology Among Cold War Correspondents

November 15, 2021

City University of London Senior Lecturer Dina Fainberg explores the experiences of U.S. and Soviet foreign correspondents during the Cold War and the competing notions of truth they pursued in their reporting. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/

Episode 91: Ratings Powerhouses Univision and Telemundo

Episode 91: Ratings Powerhouses Univision and Telemundo

November 1, 2021

Author Craig Allen describes how Spanish-language television networks Univision and Telemundo became ratings powerhouses by programming a unique mix of news, soccer, telenovelas and variety shows. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/

Episode 90: How the Other Half Lives

Episode 90: How the Other Half Lives

October 18, 2021

Historian Keith Greenwood shares the story of muckraker Jacob Riis and his famous photography examining How the Other Half Lives. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/

Episode 89: Civil War Press Suppression in the American West

Episode 89: Civil War Press Suppression in the American West

October 4, 2021

Researcher Mary Lamonica describes the editorial battles waged among American West newspaper editors during the Civil War and the impact that pro-Union support for press suppression had on defining the boundaries of free speech.

Episode 88: Covering the Kent State Shootings

Episode 88: Covering the Kent State Shootings

September 20, 2021

Author Bob Giles discusses his book, When Truth Mattered: The Kent State Shootings 50 Years Later, and what it was like to be an editor in charge of that coverage in 1970. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/ 

 

Episode 87: Reporting from Ground Zero

Episode 87: Reporting from Ground Zero

September 6, 2021

Former television reporter Vince DeMentri recalls reporting live from the wreckage of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11. You can also find essays about the history of journalism and 9/11 at our website https://journalism-history.org/. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/ 

Episode 86: Woodrow Wilson’s Ministry of Propaganda

Episode 86: Woodrow Wilson’s Ministry of Propaganda

August 16, 2021

Author John Maxwell Hamilton analyzes the propaganda spread during World War I by President Woodrow Wilson’s Committee on Public Relations. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/

Episode 85: Making Jesse James a Folk Hero

Episode 85: Making Jesse James a Folk Hero

August 2, 2021

Researcher Cathy Jackson explains the outsized role that newspapers played in making a folk hero out of Jesse James. Show transcripts are available at https://journalism-history.org/podcast/

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