Journalism History
Episode 23: They Came to Toil

Episode 23: They Came to Toil

May 13, 2019

Professor Melita Garza discusses newspaper representations of Mexicans and immigrants during the Great Depression years and the issues that remain in current times.

Episode 22: The Bare-Knuckle Boxing Championship of 1860

Episode 22: The Bare-Knuckle Boxing Championship of 1860

April 29, 2019

Scholar Scott Peterson describes the colorful news coverage of an 1860 match between John C. Heenan and Tom Sayers for the bare-knuckle boxing championship of the world.

Episode 21: Hidden Figures in Public Relations History

Episode 21: Hidden Figures in Public Relations History

April 15, 2019

Researcher Denise Hill provides an overdue spotlight on African-American public relations practitioners, including Ida B. Wells, Henry Lee Moon, Moss Kendrix and Inez Kaiser.

Episode 20: We Want Fish Sticks

Episode 20: We Want Fish Sticks

April 8, 2019

Author Nick Hirshon reviews the worst branding campaign in sports history as described in his new book, We Want Fish Sticks: The Bizarre and Infamous Rebranding of the New York Islanders.

Episode 19: Native Advertising from Franklin to Facebook

Episode 19: Native Advertising from Franklin to Facebook

April 1, 2019

Scholar Ava Sirrah discusses her research on the history of native advertisements in American news media, from Benjamin Franklin’s Pennsylvania Gazette to Mark Zuckerberg’s Facebook.

Episode 18: Wars on the Press by Richard Nixon and Donald Trump

Episode 18: Wars on the Press by Richard Nixon and Donald Trump

March 18, 2019

Author Mark Feldstein discusses the nasty relationship between President Richard Nixon and investigative journalist Jack Anderson as well as the many criticisms leveled against the news media by President Donald Trump.

Episode 17: Press Portrayals of Native Americans

Episode 17: Press Portrayals of Native Americans

March 4, 2019

Professor John Coward discusses problematic portrayals of Native Americans in the press throughout history and how native journalists have used the power of their own presses to make their voices heard.

Episode 16: The Man Behind “The Media in America”

Episode 16: The Man Behind “The Media in America”

February 18, 2019

William David Sloan reviews his career as the prolific author of almost 50 books on the news media, including his role as editor of “The Media in America,” the leading textbook of mass communication history.

Episode 15: A “Carnival” Trial and the Free Press

Episode 15: A “Carnival” Trial and the Free Press

February 4, 2019

A doctor accused of viciously murdering his wife was ultimately acquitted after a 1966 Supreme Court ruling blamed a "carnival atmosphere" created by reporters. But that wasn't the end of the story. Professor Erin Coyle discusses this critical turning point in media-law history.

Episode 14: Salem, Murder & The Press

Episode 14: Salem, Murder & The Press

January 21, 2019

In 1830 Salem, the murder of a sea captain created a media frenzy that can still provide lessons for journalists today. James Farrell of the University of New Hampshire discusses this early study in pre-trial publicity.